Question: What Do Bright White Spots On A Bone Scan Mean?

What does a hot spot on a bone scan mean?

The areas where the radionuclide collects are called “hot spots,” and may indicate the presence of conditions such as arthritis , malignant (cancerous) bone tumors , metastatic bone cancer (cancer which has spread from another site, such as the lungs), bone infections , bone trauma not seen on ordinary X-rays, and ….

What do white spots on bone scan mean?

Hot spots describe places where an excess of radioactive substance has collected. Cold spots, on the other hand, are areas where it didn’t collect at all. Abnormal results can indicate that you have a bone disorder, such as cancer or arthritis or infection in the bone.

What does cancer look like on a bone scan?

Most bone cancers show up on x-rays of the bone. The bone at the site of the cancer may look “ragged” instead of solid. The cancer can also appear as a hole in the bone. Sometimes doctors can see a tumor around the defect in the bone that might extend into nearby tissues (such as muscle or fat).

Does a bone scan show inflammation?

Bone scan is one of the most common and oldest examinations among all nuclear medicine procedures. … [1] Though the reported sensitivity of bone scan is high, its specificity is low due to increased metabolic activity seen in benign disease such as trauma, infection, inflammation, and degenerative joint diseases.

What does an abnormal bone scan look like?

Results are considered abnormal when the scan shows darker “hot spots” or lighter “cold spots” in the bones. Hot spots describe places where an excess of radioactive substance has collected. Cold spots, on the other hand, are areas where it didn’t collect at all.

What does a positive bone scan mean?

A bone scan is a nuclear medicine test. This means that the procedure uses a very small amount of a radioactive substance, called a tracer. The tracer is injected into a vein. It shows possible cancer in areas where too much or too little tracer has been absorbed by the body.